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How to Structure Your Blog Posts Using HTML <H> and <P> Tags

When writing your blog articles, highlight your heading and subheadings using <H> Tags. You are given six heading tags and one paragraph tag in HTML.


<H1> through <H6> are the heading (or title) tags plus a <P> for paragraph tags. Paragraphs always start on a new line. They are blocks of texts with white space above and below.


The Title Tags Blog Structure
Blog heading (<H>) in order of importance


The Most Important ‘Top’ Tag is the <H1>

This tag is generally reserved for the title of your blog. Each subsequent <H> is less important. In other words, <H1> is the most important and <H2> is of secondary importance …. All the way down to <H6>.


The use of <H> tags allows Google to understand and analyse the structure of your content better. And using <H> tags guides the Google bots through your blog article and makes indexing easier.


You ‘should’ use your keywords in your <H> tags but don’t fuss over this too much because Google is super smart. It knows, when it scans your blog, what your blog is about. This is not to say that you shouldn’t put effort into your <H1> because the main title of your blog is what people see when they search the internet. You want your <H1> to ‘hook’ the person into reading your content.


How Many <H> Tags Should You Use?

First up, you should only have one <H1> tag. In most cases, your <H1> tag is the headline of your blog. The <H1> is the main heading that sits at the top of your blog and it is what’s seen by people when they search for your content on Google.


‘Winning with Blogs’ is my <H1> tag.

How your H1 Tags show up in Google

Don’t use <H1> tags for additional headings. Typically your blog will have the main headline tag (<H1>) and then <H2> tags for each of your subheadings, and under the subheadings you’ll have paragraphs (<P>). It’s not necessary to use <H3> through to <H6> unless you have a very long and complicated blog with multiple subheadings and sub-subheadings, and sub-sub-subheadings, and so forth.


The Structure of Your Blogs Using HTML Tags


<H1> Winning with Blogs (this is the topic of the blog/the headline)

<H2> The Reasons Why You Need to Blog (this is the subheading)

<H3> You’ll Rank Higher in Google (this is the sub-subheading)

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.

<H3> The sub-subheading goes here.

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.

<H3> The sub-subheading goes here.

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.


<H2> What are Great Topics to Blog About (this is the subheading)

<H3> The sub-subheading goes here. (this is the sub-subheading)

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.

<H3> The sub-subheading goes here.

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.

<H3> The sub-subheading goes here.

<P> The paragraph goes here.

<P> The next paragraph goes here.

<P> Then the next paragraph goes here.


You’ll see from the above example that <H2> tags are of the highest importance, under the <H1> tag. Then <H3> tags are of less importance. However, you do not need to tag the sub-sub headings as <H3> tags. You can use many <H3> through to <H6> if you want to purposely guide Google through your content.


The Three Best Practices for HTML Tags

The incorrect use of tags is unlikely to impact your search ranking. What does impact your search ranking is how your blog looks to a customer because as long as your content is laid out in a way that gives the customer a pleasurable user experience (UX), Google will be happy. But if you’re a super fussy person who strives for excellence in everything you do, here’s a few quick tips:

1. Keep your headings <H> short ...

Ideally, your heading tags should contain less than six words. If you cram too much information into your H tags, you’ll confuse Google. Just make sure your headlines are descriptive and it reveals precisely what the blog is about.


2. Use only one H1 tag on each page of your website ...

The H1 tag is your headline and should explain what the content on your webpage is about. If you use more than one H1 tag you will confuse Google because it won’t know how to index your webpage and therefore it won’t index your webpage and show it in search results.


3. Use your keywords in your H1 only if it makes sense to do so.

This sounds counterintuitive but always remember that your goal is to provide Google with valuable informative content so just make sure your H1 tag headline is a hook to lure your customers into reading your blog.

In Summary


If you blog on a regular basis, blogging will become a habit and you’ll enjoy the process. Don’t get too caught up in the HTML headings structure of your blogs. Instead, let your creative mind prioritise actually writing blogs rather than getting confused with the technicalities of it all.


Inject your blogs with interesting and entertaining content that gives customer value. Try to make your customers feel something, even if it’s just a little bit of curiosity … because FOMO is a thing right.


The more you blog, the more Google will notice and what you blog about today, will be forevermore indexed in search engines, providing evergreen content that will boost your SEO rankings now and in the future.


If you’re stuck for topic ideas for your blog, head on over to this webpage.


If you’re time poor and don’t particularly like content writing, then use the most popular artificial intelligence software in the world to pump out for you original plagiarism free blogs that are SEO optimised to include <H> tags, in a matter of minutes.


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